Easy fruit smoothie 

wine glass of creamy looking smoothie Ta da.

Start the day with a health-boosting refreshing fresh fruit drink.

You need an electric hand-blender to do the whizzing. I use the cheapest, least fancy (about £20) – my most valuable and versatile piece of kitchen technology.

Banana is the base – add fruit such as apple/pear/orange/berries.
Apple, orange and pear in the curve of banana's

Use the whole apple/pear: whizz it up, pips, peel and all. Don’t even peel the apple/pear (especially if organic).

Yes, take stones out of mango/peach/plum/apricot. (Blender blade can’t cope).
Yes, peel the orange.

But no need to de-pith orange. Whizz it up with pith, and pips.

Fruit in cut up piecesI learned this time-saving tip at a raw food workshop by Kira G Goldy. Kira is also a healer.

She encouraged me to write creatively: “You have all these voices inside that want to be heard.”

As a journalist, a challenge. But her words rung true. I focused on writing and two things have developed from my new intention.

I give courses to facilitate creative writing (and at the same time teach myself as it turns out).

And I have written a verbatim play based on interviews of people facing eviction in the hyper-regeneration of Brixton, and Lambeth council estates.

Verbatim is like journalism because it is entirely made of people’s quotes, like a documentary. The subject – how profit-driven thinking wrecks human lives – is a subject close to my campaigning heart.

The play is a collaboration with Changing Face Collective and director Lucy Curtis.

Where Will We Live? premieres at Southwark Playhouse on 25 – 28 November 2015.

I will need to keep my strength up. Time to make an easy smoothie!

Smoothie recipe for 1 – 2

Use organic fruit if possible. Why organic?

1 apple (cut-up with pips and peel ) 
1 orange (cut-up with pith and pips) 
1 banana (peeled and sliced)
Half a glass of water/milk (dairy/plant) to thin
A dollop of peanut butter and/or coconut oil and/or yogurt for protein and good fats. Or a handful of cashew nuts soaked overnight in water 
Optional: ground cinnamon/raw ginger
Blend with a hand-blender in a jug, pour and enjoy.

Ta da!

Blackberry jam is easy to make

Toast with home made blackberry jam

If you have never made jam, blackberry jam is a good one to start with. It is quick (fruit is easy to prepare and jam sets quickly), and no specialist equipment is needed.
Blackberries on a Bristol allotment

Blackberries growing in hedgerows are plentiful now. Nice to know some things are in abundance… Obviously, check you are picking the right fruit. I don’t want you to pick the wrong berries.




Juice of a lemon



I used 1 pound of blackberries with 1 pound of sugar and 3/4 pint of water

I used equal amounts of fruit and sugar. If you use more sugar (as most recipes suggest), you will indeed produce more jam. And maybe the jam will last longer because of the preserving quality of the sugar. But it will also be more sickly-sweet.

Personally, I prefer my version. Because I only produced a small amount, it will get scoffed quickly. And it is delicious: slightly tart, and very fruity.

(I will convert to metrics later! This blog is written in a hurry because I mistakenly published it via my WordPress App with images only! Mon dieu quel eejit…Now I am swiftly adding words.).


Take the berries off the stem, give them a quick rinse and weigh them.

Put a small plate in the freezer or a cold place which will help to test if jam is set as I will explain later.

Put the blackberries in a saucepan with the water. Get it bubbling for a good 40 minutes until the water is reduced and fruit is soft.

Add the lemon juice and the sugar. Bubble and boil for ten minutes.

Take the jam off the heat while testing to see if it is set.

Blob of jam cooling on a plate

Test for a set by blobbing a bit of the runny jam on a very cold saucer or plate.

Prod the jam gently with a finger to see if it wrinkles. If it is set, it will wrinkle-up (oh yes, we love wrinkles) and not run in a dribble when you tip the plate.

If it is still dribbly, cook the jam for another five minutes (maybe more water needs to evaporate?) and test again.


This jam set after ten minutes just as the recipes said. It is so easy. Not like making marmalade which is a bit of a palaver.

Here are two jars filled with my home-made jam.

Two pots of home made blackberry jam

Slightly smug rating = 10/10.

Making chicken soup from scratch

Raw high-welfare chicken and cut-up carrots and red onion covered with water in a panThe secret of chicken soup is to use raw chicken.

By all means, use a cooked chicken carcass to make stock but if you want to make healing chicken soup, start from scratch with raw chicken.

I used two legs from Abel and Cole high-welfare chickens.

Add a cut-up onion and carrots. Cover with water. If you use loads of water, it will dilute the soup. But just covering the chicken and veg with water will create the right concentrated amount.

Bring to the boil and simmer for about one and a half hours to two hours until the chicken is tender and falls away from the bone.

The next secret – imparted by my mother – is not to let the precious liquid boil away. So keep a lid on the pan. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Strain to drink the healing soup – this article explains why chicken soup has healing properties.

The beautifully-tender chicken and vegetables will make another meal.

It is simple to make, and will bring strength.

My grandmother’s beetroot soup

Cup of purple coloured soup pictured from above against big pink flowers

Image: Michael Caplan

I ring my mother. She is 92.

“Do you use beef stock to make beetroot soup?” I ask.

“No,” Fay says, “we never used beef stock. This is how we did it,” said my mother. “This is my mother’s recipe.”

Sarah’s beetroot soup

Slice the beetroots.

Cover with water. Simmer for about half an hour until tender. 

Drain the sliced beetroot and keep the beetroot stock. 

(You don’t use the sliced beetroot for the soup. My mum says: use them in a salad with sour cream with sliced onions). 

Beat 2 eggs with the juice of one lemon.

Add carefully- or eggs will curdle – to some of the warmed beetroot stock.  

Once the beaten eggs are incorporated into this small amount, tip it into the main soup.

Reheat carefully – very carefully – so the eggs don’t curdle. 

Add sour cream if desired.  

Thanks, mum.

This purple-looking healing soup, which I make with organic ingredients for extra quality, health and taste, enables nourishment to slip-in unsuspected via its beetroot-sweet, lemony lightness.

My grandmother Sarah died when I was 16. She was warm, earthy and wise, with fierce opinions I did not always agree with. Born in 1899 in London, her parents were migrants from anti-semitic Tsarist Belarus and Lithuania. I think of her so much in my heart.

My mother says the older she gets, the more she thinks of her grandmother, Jesse, (Sarah’s mother).  Jesse died when my mother was ten years old.  My mother says: “I talk to her every day. I call to her by her Yiddish name, Yeshki. She used to read the Yiddish translation of Shakespeare’s plays.” (I only learned that bit yesterday when reading out this blog to my mum).

My mother repeats stories endlessly so we remember them. My mother’s recollection of her grandmother are imprinted on my DNA since childhood so I have absorbed Jess’s “live each day as if it were your last” philosophy.

My mum again:  “Jesse used to say: I am not frightened of death,’ and pointing over to the window, she would say: ‘It’s as if I’m passing to the other side of that net curtain.'” 

So, eat beet soup, and enjoy this precious life!

Gut gastronomy beef broth

A bowl of beef broth

Beef broth soothes the digestion and produces easy-to-absorb minerals including calcium. Made with bones, it is a low-cost way of sustaining your health. 

“A good broth will resurrect the dead,” is an old South American proverb. I can believe it.

Read more about broth’s healing powers at the Weston Price Foundation and the way broth also delivers easy-to-absorb broken-down material from cartilage and tendons that might help arthritis and joint pain.

I bought the beef rib bones from Sheepdrove Organic Farm for £2.50 per kg. 

Why organic? Because I want to eat meat from an animal which has not been given routine antibiotics, which has chewed fresh grass in the fields as nature intended (not convenience-food grain that gives the beast a belly-ache), and can follow its natural animal behaviour. 

I used a recipe from Gut Gastronomy by nutritional therapist Vicky Edgson and Grayshott spa chef Adam Palmer based on the spa’s health regime. Published by Jacqui Small, this fine book with beautiful images by Lisa Linder is filled with highly nutritious recipes to help increase digestive health, and repair and nourish the body.  

The Gut Gastronomy recipe uses beef marrow bones. 

Here is the recipe slightly adapted. 

For four: 3 kg (6lb 10 oz) beef bones cut into 3 cm pieces 

Chop: 4 carrots, 3 large onions, 4 celery sticks (optional)

Add: 2 bay leaves, 10 whole peppercorns,

If you have some, half bunch of thyme. 

I also added dried chilli for extra hotness. 

roasted bones and pan with carrots and onions

Roast the cut bones in a large roasting dish for 30 – 40 minutes at Gas Mark 7. 

Drain 2 teaspoons of the fat from the bones into a large saucepan and sauté the veg.

(There was no fat from my rib bones so I omitted this stage and added the carrots and onions at the next stage.)

Add the bay leaves, peppercorns (and dried chilli), sprigs of thyme and roasted bones and cover with 5 litres (8 3/4 pints/ 20 cups) of cold water. Skim any fat as you bring it to a simmer. Gently cook for 5 – 6 hours. 

Broth is served clear, strained of meat and vegetables. Strain to make consommé, and cool before freezing. I shredded the plentiful meat from the bones and made several servings of delicious broth with meat (see top pic). 

I swear I cured my poor inflamed gums thanks to this healing soup.

Fellow blogger, Annie Levy at Kitchen Counter Culture, suggested I used some of the broth for borscht, which I did, using my grandmother’s recipe.

And that is for the next blog post. 

Rhubarb Kimchi

Elisabeth Winkler:

I never know what to do with rhubarb (don’t like all the sweetness needed to make it palatable) so this is a welcome recipe from Annie Levy’s Kitchen Counter Culture blog.

Rhubarb grows plentifully now in the ‘hungry gap’ when the UK’s productivity of fresh produce is at its lowest.

Since Annie Levy introduced me to kimchi via a jar of plum kimchi sent by post, I make it regularly . This Korean condiment combines two fine attributes: zingy-taste and digestion-soother. Now with rhubarb, a third quality can be added: super-seasonal.

Rhubarb kimchi is the answer!

Originally posted on Kitchen Counter Culture:


La la la la la la la LA LAAAAAAAAAH.  La la la la la la la.  LA.  LA.  LAAAAAAHHHHHHH.

Sing along with me, the Rhubarb Kimchi Song.  As Plum Kimchi heralded autumn, Rhubarb Kimchi will greet the spring. La La lalalalalalahhhh.

I pulled some stalks from a perennial bed I’d made last year.  Everything’s come up again, which is satisfying for a not-great gardener like me.


Removed the poisonous leaves, and sliced them.

IMG_5615 (1)

And added some sea salt, some orange zest, and juice of that orange.  And some spring onions.


And massaged the mix with a paste of chilli powder, garlic, ginger, onion seeds (kalonji/ nigella), and a little sugar.

IMG_5618 (1)

And smushed it down in a jar.  (The jar doesn’t need to be covered with a lid actually.  And I’ll keep it on a plate, because in the next few days the fluid is going to rise and fall.)


Rhubarb Kimchi Recipe

Mix together:
12 oz/…

View original 169 more words

Bristol Metrobus protest protecting trees and soil

Makeshift field kitchen with two smiling cooks      

Instead of running away to join the circus, I would join a protest camp: outdoor places of learning and purpose, infused with community spirit and love of the land, they give me hope. 

I visited the Rising Up camp on Friday 13 February 2015.

The camp is protecting land and trees from a destructive and unnecessary road-and-bridge building scheme to create a bus route (Bristol needs more buses but not new roads).  

The soil at stake is part of the Blue Finger with prime agricultural soil. It is irreplaceable. Soil takes centuries to form yet can be lost in no time. 

Look at the timing: the destruction of these Bristol soils takes place in the year the United Nations has launched the International Year of Soils 2015 to alert the world to the destruction of a resource on which we depend for over 95% of our food. 

Look at the timing: The University of Sheffield has found UK’s soils are so degraded, there may only be enough for 100 more harvests, it warned last autumn.

Look at the timing: the destruction of Bristol’s soils takes place in the year that Bristol is European Green Capital 2015

In other words, one part of the system is aware of the importance of protecting our planet, while the other part of the system is intent on destroying it.

It is not only the trees and land of the allotments at Stapleton allotments and Feed Bristol that will suffer.

Here is the Metrobust 2015 calendar of city-wide destructionmetrobust-calendar-4

The Metrobus scheme received final planning approval on the 27 August 2014 from Bristol City Council planning committee, despite two years of protest. 

The following are worth reading: 

Court order for immediate possession

On Thursday 12 February 2015, Bristol City Council went to the High Court to evict the protesters and, surprise surprise, with the aid of top lawyers, Burges Salmon, (and supporters of Bristol Green Capital) won a court order. Above and below is a copy of the council’s possession order.

Court order for immediate possession

Court order for immediate possession delivered

A man (who gave me permission to take his photo but would not say where he was from) handed over the order on Friday 13 December 2015.  

Tree top camps Bristol

The tree top protestors hope to halt the felling of these irreplaceable trees.

Tree top camps Bristol Metrobus protest

Treetop protest Metrobus Bristol

Protected trees sign

The trees are protected – read the notice!

Bailliffs' steel fence and spotlights protest camp Metrobus Bristol

 At the edge of the protest camp, bailiffs set up flood lights last week which are kept on ALL NIGHT. 

Bailiffs' spotlight Metrobus Bristol

Which side of this steel fence would you rather be on?

Compost toilet Metrobus Bristol

Back in the protest camp, a beautiful village has sprung up including with a compost loo (above).

Field kitchen Rising Up camp

The field kitchen under canvas cooks healthy meals.

Lentils for the pot Rising Up protest camp

Leanna wields a packet of nutrition-laden red lentils.

Mishappen parsnip Metrobus Bristol

Leanna shows me a cosmetically-imperfect but perfectly-healthy parsnip – the kind of produce that would be rejected by a supermarket.

Cooking pot field kitchen Metrobus Bristol

Leanna who is studying nutrition tells me how she and Jack made the communal stew: Chopped onions and chilli coated in coconut oil and fried with spices to hand including turmeric and coriander spices, with water added to stew to cook the lentils and rice (providing all 8 essential amino acids) and parsnips and carrots (once muddy now scrubbed and cut), with fresh tomatoes and cauliflower and cabbage and fresh garlic added at the end.

Stew served at log table Metrobus protest Bristol

Stew is served on a log table.

Rising Up poster

The Rising Up notice (above) says, this situation:

“reveals the crisis of our systems and our leadership. If our Mayor cannot call for the design to be altered, to stop the destruction (and he says he cannot) who has the power to bring the beast to heel?

Perhaps it is only us“.

This Rising up camp shows people of spirit and principle proclaim a stand against the might of a mindless system that turns a blind eye to its own destructiveness. 

The brave protestors await the bailiffs to descend at any moment to remove them from the land and trees they are trying to protect.

Please sign this petition to show your support

– currently only 1,500 signatures away from 5,000!