Category Archives: recipe idea

Turmeric Tonic 

I love a good tonic.

Here is one I concocted to boost my immune system last week when I played York in six shows over four days (the closest I have come to doing an extreme sport, ever.).

The play was a regendered production (hence me as York) of Henry VI Part 3 by feminist Shakespearian ensemble company, The Barded Ladies.

Things got done with encouragement, creativity and playfulness, rather than dominance and criticism. Made me hopeful: you can run the world  without being a bully.

Here is the tonic recipe, in brief:


I used turmeric root and ginger root. Try health food stores, or greengrocers’ especially Middle Eastern or African ones.

(Omilord, can you imagine how bland food would be in the UK – without immigrant cuisine?).


Peel the roots and cut up small.

If no roots can be found, use 1-2 teaspoon each of turmeric and ginger.

Add the juice of 4 squeezed lemons – organic ones tend to be smaller but juicier.

(I have just discovered Sunita from squeezed organic Sicilian lemons. I felt a right cheat but it uses no preservatives, so there is no chemical aftertaste).

Stop press: Add black pepper and oil to the concoction to increase  bio-availability of the turmeric. (Thanks, Jane!).

Add runny honey to taste. Whizz all together with a hand blender.

A wide awake tangy taste in smoothies AND a savoury dressing. And, of course, for sipping backstage.

Here is some of the feedback the Barded Ladies production received:

Sore throat? Use the whole lemon!  

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I had a sore throat. My mother said:

“Drink hot lemon. Use the whole lemon.”

Yeah, yeah, I know about lemons. Indeed, lemon water  – a squeeze o’ lemon  in water plus the peel – is my daily, refreshing, health-giving drink.

But, wait….

The whole lemon? A revelation.

“In the days before antibiotics, that is what we used,” says my mother, now aged 93. “My grandfather used to gargle every morning with warm salted water to prevent infections.”

Lemons deliver an impressive 187% of a person’s daily value of Vitamin C, as well as a host of other disease-fighting nutrients, according to Dr Mercola.

So I squeeze the juice of a whole lemon in a mug of boiling hot water and add a dessertspoon of honey.

Don’t stint on the honey. It makes it delightful to drink – and honey adds health-giving properties.

I cannot mention honey without comment: How outrageous that pesticides used by chemical agriculture are killing our beautiful bees.

My throat felt much better. So I made myself another hot drink with the juice of a whole lemon. And my sore throat was cured.

I also reach for the raw ginger, and raw garlic, when under-the-weather. What are your favourite natural remedies?

Lemon to be squeezed and South Gloucestershire jar of honey

DIY liqueurs

Right now, I am all about the potions.

Home made potions

It all started when a friend gave me sloe berries from her freezer – and the thorn from the sloe berry bush to prick them to release their juices.

As I added the pricked and bleeding sloe berries to the gin, I thought:

“The possibilities are endless.”

I drink rarely but when I do I like cocktails, and liqueurs. But I don’t like: the sicklyness of too much sugar, and additives instead of real ingredients.

So this Christmas, I concocted the following:

Apricots soaked in brandy – I used Hunza apricots which have a small stone and fine pedigree (one of the founders of the organic movement, Sir Robert McCarrison, learnt about nutrition in the 1920s from the Hunza tribe in Pakistan, so impressed was he by their health and vitality compared to sickly English people. The Hunzas are known for their longevity, thanks to their wholesome diet). Make sure the apricots are completely covered with the brandy. The apricots soak up the alcohol and swell, so leave room in your glass container for this effect.

Home-made Cointreau – organic orange peel from 2 – 3 oranges soaked in vodka

Home made whiskey zapper
Whiskey zapper – 200 mls whiskey + 300 mls expresso coffee + 400 mls coconut milk + agave nectar.

You don’t need to use expensive spirits – the natural flavours will enhance the potion.

Drink responsibly, and drink water too.

Happy shiny new 2016 year!

Easy fruit smoothie 

wine glass of creamy looking smoothie Ta da.

Start the day with a health-boosting refreshing fresh fruit drink.

You need an electric hand-blender to do the whizzing. I use the cheapest, least fancy (about £20) – my most valuable and versatile piece of kitchen technology.

Banana is the base – add fruit such as apple/pear/orange/berries.
Apple, orange and pear in the curve of banana's

Use the whole apple/pear: whizz it up, pips, peel and all. Don’t even peel the apple/pear (especially if organic).

Yes, take stones out of mango/peach/plum/apricot. (Blender blade can’t cope).
Yes, peel the orange.

But no need to de-pith orange. Whizz it up with pith, and pips.

Fruit in cut up piecesI learned this time-saving tip at a raw food workshop by Kira G Goldy. Kira is also a healer.

She encouraged me to write creatively: “You have all these voices inside that want to be heard.”

As a journalist, a challenge. But her words rung true. I focused on writing and two things have developed from my new intention.

I give courses to facilitate creative writing (and at the same time teach myself as it turns out).

And I have written a verbatim play based on interviews of people facing eviction in the hyper-regeneration of Brixton, and Lambeth council estates.

Verbatim is like journalism because it is entirely made of people’s quotes, like a documentary. The subject – how profit-driven thinking wrecks human lives – is a subject close to my campaigning heart.

The play is a collaboration with Changing Face Collective and director Lucy Curtis.

Where Will We Live? premieres at Southwark Playhouse on 25 – 28 November 2015.

I will need to keep my strength up. Time to make an easy smoothie!

Smoothie recipe for 1 – 2

Use organic fruit if possible. Why organic?

1 apple (cut-up with pips and peel ) 
1 orange (cut-up with pith and pips) 
1 banana (peeled and sliced)
Half a glass of water/milk (dairy/plant) to thin
A dollop of peanut butter and/or coconut oil and/or yogurt for protein and good fats. Or a handful of cashew nuts soaked overnight in water 
Optional: ground cinnamon/raw ginger
Blend with a hand-blender in a jug, pour and enjoy.

Ta da!

My grandmother’s beetroot soup

Cup of purple coloured soup pictured from above against big pink flowers

Image: Michael Caplan

I ring my mother. She is 92.

“Do you use beef stock to make beetroot soup?” I ask.

“No,” Fay says, “we never used beef stock. This is how we did it,” said my mother. “This is my mother’s recipe.”

Sarah’s beetroot soup

Slice the beetroots.

Cover with water. Simmer for about half an hour until tender. 

Drain the sliced beetroot and keep the beetroot stock. 

(You don’t use the sliced beetroot for the soup. My mum says: use them in a salad with sour cream with sliced onions). 

Beat 2 eggs with the juice of one lemon.

Add carefully- or eggs will curdle – to some of the warmed beetroot stock.  

Once the beaten eggs are incorporated into this small amount, tip it into the main soup.

Reheat carefully – very carefully – so the eggs don’t curdle. 

Add sour cream if desired.  

Thanks, mum.

This purple-looking healing soup, which I make with organic ingredients for extra quality, health and taste, enables nourishment to slip-in unsuspected via its beetroot-sweet, lemony lightness.

My grandmother Sarah died when I was 16. She was warm, earthy and wise, with fierce opinions I did not always agree with. Born in 1899 in London, her parents were migrants from anti-semitic Tsarist Belarus and Lithuania. I think of her so much in my heart.

My mother says the older she gets, the more she thinks of her grandmother, Jesse, (Sarah’s mother).  Jesse died when my mother was ten years old.  My mother says: “I talk to her every day. I call to her by her Yiddish name, Yeshki. She used to read the Yiddish translation of Shakespeare’s plays.”

I am showing my mum this blog on my phone

(I only learned that bit yesterday when reading out this blog to my mum – see pic above).

My mother repeats stories endlessly so we remember them. My mother’s recollection of her grandmother are imprinted on my DNA since childhood so I have absorbed Jess’s “live each day as if it were your last” philosophy.

My mum again:  “Jesse used to say: I am not frightened of death,’ and pointing over to the window, she would say: ‘It’s as if I’m passing to the other side of that net curtain.'” 

So, eat beet soup, and enjoy this precious life!


Coconut benefits banana bread

Banana bread

Funny to think that, as a child, I thought of coconuts as fairground shies, or Bounty chocolate bars. Yet coconuts are far more versatile than that. 

Coconuts produce coconut oil, coconut flesh, coconut milk, and coconut water, naturally and healthily.

Like hemp, coconut is nourishing, health-giving, and practical too. Think coir matting

Coconuts act as body moisturiser, teeth-cleaner, digestion-soother, rehydrater. And more. 

Coconut even sorts out head lice, according to Dr Mercola’s wondrous list of coconut’s varied uses.

If you love scientific facts and opinion with lots of swear words, check out Shannon’s Kitchen on coconut’s versatility and health reputation.

My coconut musing is prompted by a hamper full of coconut joy sent by Cocofina.

Cocofina coconut products

Cocofina have been cracking coconuts since 2005. The name says it all: Cocofina is made from fine young coconuts picked at their peak when its water is at its most plentiful.

To add to my joy, Cocofina is certified organic (by the Soil Association), which is shorthand for healthily-grown food, with no chemical fertilisers/pesticides to pollute soil, air, crops, wildlife and farm workers.

Cocofina’s big triumph is to produce delicious on-the-go nutrition energy bars. I sampled them with various energy-snack (and coconut) lovers, and their praise was unstinting.

And I love its coconut nectar – low-GI slow-release sweetness without that crazy thing that happens to my eyes (as if they are being squeezed) when I eat sugar.

(Pause to reflect on sugar – how it drove slavery, and now makes mental slaves of us all via obesity and the money markets).

To celebrate coconut happiness, I made banana cake, substituting sugar with coconut nectar, and coconut oil instead of butter.

Along with pre-soaked sultanas, this recipe produced a light, healthy cake, its bananariness lifted by nectar and complimented by coconut.

Banana bread

If you don’t have self-raising flour, add an extra egg. Keep the baking powder/bicarbonate of soda to a scant teaspoon – just enough to lighten the flour but not too much to impart its strange fizzy taste. Or even (boldly) omit and rely on beaten eggs instead.

2/3 large mashed ripe or over-ripe bananas (up to 500g/1lb)

125g (4oz) butter/coconut oil, softened

125g (4oz) caster sugar/4 Tablespoons coconut flower nectar or honey

2 large eggs, lightly beaten with a fork until frothy with air

250g (8oz) self-raising flour (or ordinary flour with extra egg) I used gram flour made from chickpeas because wheat (argumentative fellow) does not agree with me.

1 scant tsp baking powder/bicarbonate of soda

Optional extras: sultanas soaked in water and drained, walnut pieces, cocoa nibs/lemon rind.

Oil 2lb loaf tin and line its base and sides with baking parchment/greaseproof paper.

Rub in the oil/butter/fat into the flour (+ lightening agent if used) until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Stir in the sweetener and mashed bananas and lightly beaten eggs beating it well.

Heat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4.

Turn into the tin and bake for about 1 hour until a skewer comes out clean, covering if necessary so the top does not burn. 

This recipe is a great way to use up over-ripe bananas. 

Happy eating! 

Honour the pumpkin

Pumpkin photo-shoot

18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin are thrown away every Halloween in the UK; that’s the equivalent of 1,500 double decker buses, according to the Independent.

Time to join the tweetathon using #pumpkinrescue hashtag.

The Ecologist reports on the #pumpkinrescue manifesto.

 

Here are a few points from the manifesto.

  1. All supermarkets to make publicly available the amount of food waste they create and detail what happens to it.
  2. All supermarkets to ensure safe and healthy surplus food is redistributed to those on low incomes.
  3. Government to increase their investment in the Love Food Hate Waste campaign.

I am pleased with my organic pumpkin’s potential as a lantern. It has a flat bottom so won’t roll around and it is fresh with a long stem making it easier to lift off the lid.

I am even more pleased with my pumpkin’s nutritional qualities: gentle, soluble fibre, immune-boosting vitamins and minerals, as well as carbohydrates, providing sustainable, slow-release (yet low-fat) energy.

(Above para from a book I co-wrote, Make More of Squashes).

I want to honour the pumpkin as food.

The easiest way to prepare a pumpkin is to bake it. That way you only need to slice it in two, and scoop out the innards (put the inner ligaments in the compost bin and and bake the seeds for 5 minutes in a hot oven with soya sauce, or fry them).

Here’s a great blog on how to bake a pumpkin in ten steps, including cutting tips.

If you are making a lantern, then there is no escape: you have to make the effort of scooping out the flesh. So  you might as well make the most of your hard work and not discard the goodness.

Use the pumpkin flesh in a soup with coconut milk/stock/water, and spices, or cubed in a stew.

What is your favourite pumpkin recipe?

Pan-fried pumpkin flesh atop a bed of curried coconut lentils

Pan-fried pumpkin flesh atop a bed of curried coconut lentils

 

Carved pumpkin lantern's photo shoot